Tag Archives: Social History

The Queen Of Disguise

by Hannah Howe

Known as the ‘Queen of Disguise’, Annette Kerner was a leading detective in the 1940s. Born into a wealthy family, Annette trained as a mezzo-soprano with Ivor Novello’s mother, Clara, before opening the Mayfair Detective Agency in the 1920s.

Annette’s parents opposed her singing career so, aged seventeen, Annette secretly negotiated a singing contract with a nightclub in Geneva. While crossing the Channel to France, she flirted with a fellow passenger who told her that he was an intelligence officer keeping an eye on a suspected foreign agent. The passenger went on to explain that the agent’s briefcase contained vital evidence of his guilt. Eager to impress her new friend, Annette calmly stole the briefcase and presented it to him. The agent responded by contacting his London headquarters; he urged his bosses to employ Annette as a freelance, and they agreed.

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The Birth Of Rock ‘n’ Roll

by Mansel Jones

In the 1950s, the pop charts (introduced in 1951) were dominated by the likes of Frankie Laine, Johnny Ray, Rosemary Clooney, Doris Day, Tony Bennett, Dickie Valentine and Jimmy Young. On the whole these singers produced melodic, easy-listening tunes with not much there to frighten the horses. Then, in the mid-1950s Bill Haley and Elvis Presley burst on to the scene and popular music would never be the same again.

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Richard II A Lesson From History

BY MANSEL JONES 

To the medieval mind kings were appointed by God. Therefore, to oppose a king was to challenge God. And yet, repeatedly throughout Richard II’s reign challenges were made and opposition remained strong. What provoked such opposition – the man, or his times? What led Richard to believe that he was a God? What were the factors that led to murder and rebellion?

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