Category Archives: Mom’s Favorite Reads

Mom’s Favorite Reads eMagazine May 2019

Published today, the May issue of Mom’s Favorite Reads!

In this issue…

An exclusive interview with Mark Coker, CEO of Smashwords, a must-read for all writers and readers.

Plus, articles, short stories, puzzles, humour, health, travel, interviews and a special promotional offer for authors.

View or download your FREE copy here

Departures: Misadventures in Music

by Anthony Randall

A dep turned up to a Shebeen gig once with a ludicrous amount of gear, he had at least four keyboards, a rack of amps and outboard equipment. He came highly recommended from another dep with the accolade of having once been in a well- known eighties British rock group, so we had huge expectations of the dude, but he turned out to be useless, all the gear and no idea.

To be a sort after and well employed function band musician you have to have a unique blend of versatility and humility, know all the popular tunes, or at least the rudiments and be adept with a multitude of rhythms, this fella didn’t, and unfortunately neither did some of the core members from the original line up of Superfly.

Read more in our magazine

Occidental Mindoro

BY GRANT LEISHMAN

I want to highlight a Philippine island that for many people may well be considered; “off the map” – the island of Mindoro, and more specifically the western side of the island, Occidental Mindoro.

Mindoro, a large, tear-drop shaped island is the seventh largest Island of the Philippines, at roughly 10,600 square kilometres, and lies off the south-west coast of Luzon, the main island. Its two provinces, Occidental and Oriental Mindoro are clearly delineated by a range of mountains that form the spine of the centre of the island. Although not generally seen as a tourist destination, Oriental Mindoro does contain one famous resort in Puerto Gallera, a popular spot for divers and sun-seekers, located on the far north-west tip of the island. However, I want to focus on Occidental Mindoro, on its sheer unspoiled beauty and the immense potential that exists there.

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Leonardo and Galileo, Science Museums in Florence

BY FABIA SCALI-WARNER

I recently visited the Museum of Leonardo and the Museo Galileo in Florence, two small hidden gems of the Tuscan city. The main premise is that both are science museums: the former is dedicated to working replicas of the different machines designed and built by Leonardo, while the latter displays collections of several scientific instruments used throughout the XVII to the XIX century.

Both indicate the renewed interest towards science that was typical of the Renaissance, which was dedicated to the research and discovery of the laws of nature; the incredible impact of visual arts produced during that period should not make us forget just how fluid the separation was between the philosopher, the artist, the scientist and the magician/ alchemist.

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What’s Causing My Shoulder Pain?

BY CASSANDRA DENHARTOG

This is always a difficult question, due to numerous problems that could happen and the fact that the shoulder is made up of several boney, muscular, and ligamentous structures. Let’s start off with a little anatomy review.

The shoulder is made up of three large muscles collectively called the deltoids, 4 rotator cuff muscles, and several other muscles.

The deltoids individually are the anterior deltoid, medial deltoid, and posterior deltoid. These muscles help the arm with flexion (moving forward), abduction (taking the arm away from the body), and extension (bringing the arm back behind the body).

Four muscles together make up the rotator cuff.This is commonly, incorrectly, called the rotatorcup or rotary cup. The rotator cuff is made up ofthe supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis. Together they stabilize the shoulder, hold the head of the humerus into the glenoid cavity, and maintain the shoulder joint.

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Bilingualism and Special Needs

BY MILLIE SLAVIDOU

Anyone with a child being brought up in a bilingual home tends to learn early on that they need to grow a thick skin. There will be comments about their child’s development, about being behind at skill, about how useful the minority language will be, and even from professionals, such as teachers, there is frequently a lot of negativity.

So imagine how much worse all of this can be when the child in the bilingual environment has special needs. Even without the bilingual element, when a child has special needs, the parents are suddenly surrounded by experts, from the person on the street or in the supermarket, to well-meaning friends and relatives. Everyone but everyone feels a need to voice an opinion, and in the case of special needs, the social attitude towards bilingualism is overwhelmingly negative.

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Val Tobin Interviewed by Rachael Wright

There’s a cabin in rural Ontario, where the trees are bare and the rain falls in sheets. It sits on the edge of a black lake. Out of the flat black water rise sun baked wrecks of trees. There’s no guarantee that a slithering quiet creature hasn’t grabbed hold to that driftwood and in the silence lifted its hand to grip the edge of your boat.

The stuff of nightmares for many children or perhaps forgotten after hours of sunbathing, but for author Val Tobin, the family cabin she returned to each Spring was the stuff stories are made of. It has stuck with her through the years.

Read the full interview in our magazine