Leonardo and Galileo, Science Museums in Florence

BY FABIA SCALI-WARNER

I recently visited the Museum of Leonardo and the Museo Galileo in Florence, two small hidden gems of the Tuscan city. The main premise is that both are science museums: the former is dedicated to working replicas of the different machines designed and built by Leonardo, while the latter displays collections of several scientific instruments used throughout the XVII to the XIX century.

Both indicate the renewed interest towards science that was typical of the Renaissance, which was dedicated to the research and discovery of the laws of nature; the incredible impact of visual arts produced during that period should not make us forget just how fluid the separation was between the philosopher, the artist, the scientist and the magician/ alchemist.

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What’s Causing My Shoulder Pain?

BY CASSANDRA DENHARTOG

This is always a difficult question, due to numerous problems that could happen and the fact that the shoulder is made up of several boney, muscular, and ligamentous structures. Let’s start off with a little anatomy review.

The shoulder is made up of three large muscles collectively called the deltoids, 4 rotator cuff muscles, and several other muscles.

The deltoids individually are the anterior deltoid, medial deltoid, and posterior deltoid. These muscles help the arm with flexion (moving forward), abduction (taking the arm away from the body), and extension (bringing the arm back behind the body).

Four muscles together make up the rotator cuff.This is commonly, incorrectly, called the rotatorcup or rotary cup. The rotator cuff is made up ofthe supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis. Together they stabilize the shoulder, hold the head of the humerus into the glenoid cavity, and maintain the shoulder joint.

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Bilingualism and Special Needs

BY MILLIE SLAVIDOU

Anyone with a child being brought up in a bilingual home tends to learn early on that they need to grow a thick skin. There will be comments about their child’s development, about being behind at skill, about how useful the minority language will be, and even from professionals, such as teachers, there is frequently a lot of negativity.

So imagine how much worse all of this can be when the child in the bilingual environment has special needs. Even without the bilingual element, when a child has special needs, the parents are suddenly surrounded by experts, from the person on the street or in the supermarket, to well-meaning friends and relatives. Everyone but everyone feels a need to voice an opinion, and in the case of special needs, the social attitude towards bilingualism is overwhelmingly negative.

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Val Tobin Interviewed by Rachael Wright

There’s a cabin in rural Ontario, where the trees are bare and the rain falls in sheets. It sits on the edge of a black lake. Out of the flat black water rise sun baked wrecks of trees. There’s no guarantee that a slithering quiet creature hasn’t grabbed hold to that driftwood and in the silence lifted its hand to grip the edge of your boat.

The stuff of nightmares for many children or perhaps forgotten after hours of sunbathing, but for author Val Tobin, the family cabin she returned to each Spring was the stuff stories are made of. It has stuck with her through the years.

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Dr Who, Tony Whitt Interviewed by T E Hodden

A MUST FOR ALL DR WHO FANS, TONY WHITT INTERVIEWED BY T E HODDEN

Like many fans of a certain age, my first experience with many Doctor Who stories was not watching the TV screen from behind the sofa, but reading them under the blankets by torchlight. Novelisations published by Target Books, were pocket-money affordable treats, covering a vast back catalogue of adventures across time and space.

Two classic adventures, Revelation of the Daleks, and Resurrection of the Daleks, both stories of the 1980s, scripted by Eric Saward, didn’t make it into he range, due to legal issues, but will finally grace the printed page later this year.

To celebrate the landmark, and discuss the cult appeal of the novelisations, I reached out to Tony Whitt, of the Doctor Who Target Book Club Podcast. Tony, with a loyal band of brave friends, has undertaken the daunting task of reading, and reviewing every novelisation in broadcast order (which is to say, he’s reading the stories as they were shown on TV, rather than as they were published).

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Facing Your Fears

BY CHRISTINE ARDIGO MSRD

I always had a fear of heights and falling. Not sureif it’s that stomach-dropping feeling, not being in control, fearing pain, death? I remember hating when someone threw me in the air, tossed me overhead into the ocean, or pretended to drop me from a high altitude. (Okay it was only a few feet but still). I hate roller coasters. I can do most of the slides at the water parks, but spinning things? Freefalls? Upside down rides? Ah, no.

My husband left me a note the other day that I hada surprise present waiting for me on Sunday forour anniversary. Reservations were made and were nonrefundable. P.S. It would be the best five minutes of my life.

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The Queen Of Disguise

by Hannah Howe

Known as the ‘Queen of Disguise’, Annette Kerner was a leading detective in the 1940s. Born into a wealthy family, Annette trained as a mezzo-soprano with Ivor Novello’s mother, Clara, before opening the Mayfair Detective Agency in the 1920s.

Annette’s parents opposed her singing career so, aged seventeen, Annette secretly negotiated a singing contract with a nightclub in Geneva. While crossing the Channel to France, she flirted with a fellow passenger who told her that he was an intelligence officer keeping an eye on a suspected foreign agent. The passenger went on to explain that the agent’s briefcase contained vital evidence of his guilt. Eager to impress her new friend, Annette calmly stole the briefcase and presented it to him. The agent responded by contacting his London headquarters; he urged his bosses to employ Annette as a freelance, and they agreed.

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